Code & Iron

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January 27, 2014

To be Huge, you must Eventually Sell to the Laggards

The technology adoption lifecycle is demarcated into Innovators, Early Adopters, Early/Late Majorities, and the Laggards. When I spend time with my family I ask them: What software are you using? What devices have you bought? Which can’t you live without? …

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The technology adoption lifecycle is demarcated into Innovators, Early Adopters, Early/Late Majorities, and the Laggards. When I spend time with my family I ask them:

What software are you using?
What devices have you bought?
Which can’t you live without?

It is my clearest barometer of how far a trend or technology has spread.

Sister

My Sister is an Early Adopter. She was quick to recognize social media as a platform for change. She is adamantly eco and social fairness conscious. She is a native on Facebook and Twitter, and is tethered to her laptop. She bought a quad-band phone on purpose.

Sell her:
– The ability to share her identity and message with her peers and the world at large
– Technology that respects our planet and the people that live here
– Devices with a 5 year+ lifespan

Mom

My Mom fits well into the Early Majority. She doesn’t know exactly what she wants, but is sure it’s new. She fears being left behind by technological advance. She has annoyances, and if solutions are made convenient and simple she will pay dearly for them. She owns an iPhone, an iPad, and is dead-set on switching to a MacBook when she retires.

Sell her:
– A service to scan, sort, backup, and beautify her existing collection of physical photos
– Anything that keeps our geographically dispersed family connected
– An all-in-one monthly subscription to unlimited high quality Music, Movies, Books, Audiobooks, and TV. (I’m looking at you Apple and Google)

Grandma

My Grandma is well into the Late Majority. A Skype user, an iPad owner (for the Casino and Solitaire games), and a snowbird. She does not actively seek out new technology, it intrudes into her life. If it is a friendly, simple force she will embrace it, otherwise she’s just as happy to maintain the status quo. She was born in 1928, the same year as the Cathode Ray Television.

Sell her:
– Assistive devices and services to maintain her daily dignity and independence
– Entertainment that stimulates and engages her mind
– A simple way to stay updated on her Family and their daily lives

Dad

My Dad is a proud technological Laggard. In his career as a Systems Engineer he touched applications that affect hundreds of users, often in safety and liability-critical environments. In his personal life? He owns a Nokia pay as you go brick with $100/year on it. He hasn’t needed a new TV in 15 years and our old family computer has been ticking along for 10. If I sound frustrated it’s because I am. He is fiercely, vehemently against newness.

My dad is the ultimate litmus test for social acceptance of a technology. If you can make a product or service my Dad needs, and I mean really needs, you will be successful. Wildly, outrageously successful.

He recently asked me to install DropBox because he read about it in the Globe and Mail.

  Posted by Matt Holtom on January 27, 2014
July 24, 2013

Official Launch of torontofirecalls.com

We are extremely pleased to announce the launch of torontofirecalls.com in partnership with the Toronto Professional Firefighters Association!  In addition to being an internal tool for Toronto Firefighters, the application will give the Citizens of Toronto an accurate view of the types and volumes …

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We are extremely pleased to announce the launch of torontofirecalls.com in partnership with the Toronto Professional Firefighters Association!  In addition to being an internal tool for Toronto Firefighters, the application will give the Citizens of Toronto an accurate view of the types and volumes of calls that their Fire Service responds to.

This mobile-responsive web app was built to put an interesting, interactive GUI on the emergency incident data available from this City of Toronto website. The data source includes the category, location, dispatch time, alarm level, and responding apparatus for all current emergency incidents that Toronto Fire Services personnel are currently working at.

This data is scraped from the website at regular intervals and stored in our own database. A lookup is performed on the Google Geo-caching API v3 to find the latitude and longitude of the nearest intersection. Once this data is accumulated, two main views are presented to the end-user.

  1. Live Mode – a visual representation of the emergency incidents currently being worked at by TFS personnel. Updates automatically every 5 minutes with an asynchronous request for fresh JSON.
  2. History Mode – a historical search mode that allows the user to search by specifying the desired “Event types, Date Range, and Minimum Alarm Level”. Displays up to 1000 historical entries at a time.

We couldn’t be happier with the results, and we’d like to once again thank the Toronto Professional Firefighters Association for fully supporting this project and making it a reality.

A technical write up  of the design and coding will be coming soon, so stay tuned!

  Posted by Matt Holtom on July 24, 2013
January 23, 2012

Welcome

Hello World! (couldn’t resist) Welcome to the center of my personal software space. This will be a one stop shop for all things code, so if you came here expecting anything else; flee screaming. I’m planning on using this site as …

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Hello World! (couldn’t resist)

Welcome to the center of my personal software space. This will be a one stop shop for all things code, so if you came here expecting anything else; flee screaming.

I’m planning on using this site as a repository for my thoughts on crafting and testing solid software. Hopefully someone out there in the great “Blue Nowhere” will find them useful. It will also be a place to store useful scripts, commands, and tools I’m likely to forget about. For those of you who don’t know me personally, I have the memory of a goldfish.

That’s all for now, planning on changing the WordPress theme in a minute, so expect this site to be in-flux for the next few days as I play around. I know I should probably be writing my own CSS from scratch, but when I see a screw I choose a screwdriver over my fingernails every time.

Take care,

Matt

  Posted by Matt Holtom on January 23, 2012